Wula Playalong Series Vol. 6 - Sinte (Wula Online)

The nature of this project is to enable the student to develop their solo technique by learning isolated phrases played by each featured artist. Login to your Wula Account to stream or download all your Wula media any time.

  • Sinte Original Solo - Slow (sample)

     

    Sinte Playalong Solo - Slow (sample)

     

    Sinte Playalong Solo - Fast (sample)

     

  • Wula Playalong Series: Play with the Masters

    The nature of this project is to enable the student to develop their solo technique by learning isolated phrases played by each featured artist. We've chosen versions of each rhythm that are practical for the playalong experience. Some rhythms have parts like the bass djembe (Part 3) included - this may be considered a ‘Ballet’ or ‘Dance Class' version and may not be part of the traditional ensemble. Be sure to listen to the background introduction for each rhythm to understand where it's coming from.

    Sinte originates from the Nalu people of the Boke region (Coastal Guinea). It was first played on a large log drum called a kyrin. This is ONE large hollowed-out tree played by three people. It’s different from the more commonly played kyrin in the Nzerekore Region (Sacred Forest), where three smaller kyrins are played (each by one person).

    M’Bemba has a unique history with Sinte.

    In early 1996 (just after New Year's), while in Conakry, M’Bemba had arranged dance lessons with Bangaly Bangoura (great dancer of the National Ballet) to teach his student from NYC, Michael Markus. One day, as Banglaly was teaching Michael, M’Bemba came in and heard the rhythm and watched the dance. Interestingly, it was Bangaly who brought the rhythm back from the village, as it was not in the Ballet repertoire. He explained the nature of it and showed the dance steps. Although an old dance, it was new in Conakry, and this intrigued M’Bemba.

    Upon returning to NYC a month later, M’Bemba immediately created his ensemble version for djembe and dundun and recorded it on his debut CD, Wali (1996). The rhythm is funky and became super popular, especially after Youssouff Koumbassa started including it in his normal repertoire. Sinte spread like wildfire.