How to Choose a Djembe

December 02, 2017 1 min read

How to Choose a Djembe

There are so many Wula Drums to choose from, it can be hard to pick. Michael Markus, the president of Wula Drum, explains how to choose a djembe. 

Djembes have gained worldwide popularity and are made in many different locations around the world. All Wula Drums are made by hand in Guinea, West Africa – where the djembe is originally from – using the same hardwoods that have been used for generations.

Some tips:

  • Don't choose exclusively by the pitch of the djembe, because the djembe can always be tuned.
  • Choose a weight that works for you - are you walking around a lot with the djembe, or just using it at home?
  • Consider the height of the djembe and the diameter - when you sit down with the drum, will it feel comfortable to play?
  • Make sure to get a djembe that is made from a single piece of wood, with high quality rope, rings, and skin to get a long life out of the drum.

 



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